clarity clinic

Bipolar Disorder Treatment & Support

We specialize in providing the best bipolar disorder treatment and support in Chicago. Our team understands the intricate dynamics of bipolar disorder symptoms and is committed to offering personalized care tailored to each patient’s needs. With a focus on long-term stability and well-being, we’re your trusted partner in managing bipolar disorder effectively.
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What is Bipolar Disorder?

Bipolar Disorder, previously called manic-depressive disorder, is a serious psychiatric condition characterized by intense and unusual mood swings between emotional highs and lows.

The highs and lows experienced by individuals with bipolar disorder are significantly more severe than the emotional highs and lows people without the condition go through on a day-to-day basis.

Their mood swings also usually bring about extreme changes in energy, activity, sleep, and behavior. These unusually intense periods of emotional volatility are referred to as “mood episodes”, and they last anywhere from seven to fourteen days.

Each mood episode represents a marked change in a person’s usual behavior, and they can inhibit people’s ability to lead normal lives. Through prolonged and closely monitored treatment with a professional psychiatrist, those with bipolar disorder can learn to manage their mood swings and lead stable, productive, and successful lives.

Bipolar Disorder: What You Should Know

According to the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, more than five and a half million Americans are affected by bipolar disorder every year. Most individuals that suffer from bipolar disorder develop the condition in their late teens or early twenties, but it can occur at any age.

A diagnosis for bipolar disorder is made using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), and to be diagnosed, a person’s symptoms must represent a major change from their usual mood or behavior.

Mood & Manic Episodes

The fluctuations between the emotionally “high” episodes (manic or hypomanic mood episodes) and emotionally “low” (depressive mood episodes) make it difficult for individuals with bipolar and their families to recognize their symptoms.

They may be able to identify singular symptoms, but they are not always able to recognize the larger underlying issue. Consequently, some people with bipolar disorder will suffer for years before being properly diagnosed and treated.

The Severity Of Bipolar Disorder Symptoms

The longer the condition goes untreated, the more severe the symptoms become. Bipolar symptoms can result in damaged relationships with friends and family, poor work or academic performance, and in some cases even suicide.

This fact helps emphasize the importance of treatment and the severity of the condition because it shows that bipolar disorder does not get better on its own. Getting the proper treatment is the only way to ensure that bipolar individuals get their symptoms under control.

What Causes Bipolar Disorder?

The underlying cause of bipolar disorder is unknown, but there are a number of risk factors to be aware of. The most prominent risk factors are genetics, brain structure, and brain functioning.

Individuals with a first-degree relative, namely a parent or sibling, with the condition, are more susceptible to developing the condition. In regards to brain structure and functioning, an MRI study found that adults with bipolar disorder have smaller prefrontal cortices with smaller functional capacities than people without the condition.

Mood Episodes & Bipolar Disorder Symptoms

Mood episodes are the distinct periods in which individuals experience intense emotional states along with unusual sleep habits, activity levels, thoughts, and/or behavior.

Each episode denotes a drastic alteration from a person’s typical mood or behavior. During an episode, people will experience symptoms for the majority of the day and bipolar individuals usually experience multiple episodes.

The DSM delineated four particular types of mood episodes: manic episodes, hypomanic episodes, depressive episodes, and mixed episodes.

  • Manic Episodes: Manic episodes are periods of extremely elevated mood, energy, and activity levels, often associated with bipolar disorder. Symptoms include inflated self-esteem, decreased need for sleep, excessive talking, racing thoughts, distractibility, increased goal-directed activity, and risky behavior. These episodes can impair daily functioning and may require medical intervention. Mania is noticeably more severe and can even induce psychosis.
  • Hypomanic Episodes: Hypomanic episodes are similar to manic episodes but less severe. They involve elevated mood, increased energy, and activity, but do not cause significant impairment in daily functioning or require hospitalization. Symptoms may include heightened creativity and productivity, but can also lead to irritability and poor decision-making. Without proper treatment, hypomanic episodes can develop into severe mania or depression.
  • Depressive Episodes: Depressive episodes are periods characterized by intense feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and a lack of interest or pleasure in most activities. Symptoms include changes in appetite and sleep patterns, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, feelings of worthlessness or guilt, and thoughts of death or suicide. Depressive episodes significantly impair daily functioning.
  • Mixed Episodes: Mixed episodes, or mixed features, involve symptoms of both manic and depressive episodes occurring simultaneously or in rapid succession. Individuals may experience high energy and activity levels along with feelings of sadness or hopelessness. This combination can be particularly distressing and challenging to treat, often requiring specialized medical care.

For an individual to experience a manic or hypomanic episode, they must exhibit three or more of the following symptoms:

  • Feeling very “up” or “high” for an extended period
  • Feeling jumpy, wired, or abnormally upbeat
  • Extreme irritability
  • Difficulty concentrating or having racing thoughts
  • Becoming more outgoing and talking faster or more than usual
  • Increasing their amount of activity or thinking they can do a myriad of
  • things at once
  • Decreased need for sleep or sleeping less
  • Impulsivity in behavior and decision-making – engaging in excessive risky behaviors deemed pleasurable like shopping sprees or reckless sex

Feeling of Temporary Euphoric Feelings

It’s common for bipolar individuals to enjoy the euphoric feelings and increased productivity attributed to manic and hypomanic episodes, but it is important to remember that they’re impermanent. Both hypomanic and manic episodes result in an emotional crash that leaves individuals feeling depressed and worn out.

Major Depressive Episode

Major depressive episodes (MDE) are the antithesis of manic episodes. During a depressive episode, individuals become much more reserved and tend to isolate themselves. It’s common for depressive symptoms to become severe enough to disrupt their daily lives and make the most routine tasks difficult. When someone is going through an MDE, they will experience five or more of the following nine symptoms for two or more weeks:

  • Prolonged depressed mood – feeling sad or empty for the majority of the day
  • Decreased interest or pleasure in almost all activities, even those they previously enjoyed
  • Significant weight fluctuations or altered appetite
  • Insomnia or hypersomnia
  • Restlessness or slowed behaviors
  • Fatigue or loss of energy
  • Feeling excessive/inappropriate guilt or worthlessness
  • Inability to think or concentrate

Suicidal Ideation

People with bipolar disorder are more likely to seek out help amidst a depressive episode, which is why bipolar disorder is sometimes misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder. So, it’s extremely important to have your physician conduct a close examination of your previous medical history to prevent this from happening.

A mixed mood episode, or mixed state, is a manifestation of manic and depressive symptoms simultaneously. During a mixed state, individuals are likely to be more irritable than normal, have trouble sleeping, and experience a drastically changed appetite.

The National Institute of Mental Health noted that “People in a mixed state may feel very sad and hopeless while at the same time feel extremely energized.” Thus, a mixed-mood episode can be characterized by emotional uncertainty or conflict.

Bipolar Disorder & Psychosis

People with particularly severe mood episodes may develop symptoms of psychosis. Psychosis affects a person’s ability to know what’s real and what is not in addition to their thoughts and emotions.

The psychotic symptoms an individual exhibits will reflect their particular mood extremity. When a person is experiencing psychotic symptoms during a manic episode, they may believe that they’re rich and famous or have special powers like invincibility.

Conversely, psychotic symptoms during a depressive episode include the belief that they’ve committed a crime, the belief that they’ve lost all of their money, or that their life has been ruined in some way or another. As a result, bipolar individuals with psychotic symptoms can be misdiagnosed with schizophrenia.


Types of Bipolar Disorders

There are four primary types of bipolar disorder, and physicians use the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) to determine the particular form of the disorder an individual has. To be diagnosed, their symptoms must represent a marked change from their usual mood or behavior.

  • Bipolar I Disorder: Defined by one or more manic or mixed episodes lasting at least seven days, usually accompanied by major depressive episodes.
  • Bipolar II Disorder: Defined by one or more major depressive episodes accompanied by at least one hypomanic episode. This excludes full-blown manic or mixed episodes.
  • Bipolar Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (BP-NOS): Diagnosed when symptoms of the illness do not meet the criteria for any of the specific bipolar disorders, but the symptoms are clearly out of the person’s normal range of behavior.
  • Cyclothymic Disorder: Defined by at least two years of numerous periods of hypomanic symptoms that do not meet the criteria for a manic episode and numerous depressive symptoms that do not meet the criteria for a major depressive episode. This is a mild form of bipolar disorder.

It is important to note that bipolar II disorder is not a milder form of bipolar I disorder. They are completely separate diagnoses. The manic episodes of bipolar I disorder can be more severe, but individuals with bipolar II disorder can be depressed for longer periods and are more susceptible to rapid cycling bipolar disorder.

Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder

There is a severe form of bipolar disorder called Rapid-Cycling Bipolar Disorder which occurs when a person has four or more episodes of major depression, mania, hypomania, or mixed states over a single year. Rapid cycling can occur at any point within the course of the disorder and will come and go depending on the individual’s treatment.

This particular form of bipolar disorder is more common in women and those with bipolar II disorder. It has also been documented that rapid cycling occurs in individuals that experience their first mood episodes in their mid to late teens, which is earlier than most diagnoses.

Bipolar Disorder: Coexisting Conditions & Complications

People with bipolar disorder frequently have other mental or behavioral conditions that contribute to their bipolar disorder. Some of the most common coexisting conditions include:

  • Substance Abuse Problems
  • Anxiety Disorders
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Eating Disorders

Substance abuse problems are the most common cohabitation sickness, and they’re also the biggest complication attributed to bipolar individuals’ stability. Some people attempt to treat their disorder by “drowning their sorrows” in alcohol or recreational drugs.

But, this often triggers or prolongs their symptoms and the manic behavioral complications lead them to excessive indulgences. Other common complications with bipolar disorder include but are not limited to:

  • Damaged Relationships
  • Legal or Financial Problems
  • Poor Work or Academic Performance
  • Suicide or Suicide Attempts

Bipolar Disorder Treatments

There is no way to prevent the development of bipolar disorder, but seeking out treatment when you notice signs of bipolar disorder can prevent conditions from worsening.

Proper treatment with a licensed psychiatrist can help those dealing with bipolar disorder symptoms better manage their mood swings and certain destructive behaviors, improving quality of life.

Bipolar disorder treatment options include medication, psychotherapy, or a combination of medication and psychotherapy. The most effective forms of bipolar disorder treatment typically include a steady, prolonged combination of medication and psychotherapy.

Additionally, keeping a log of your daily mood symptoms, treatments, sleep patterns, and life events can help individuals and their physicians track and treat their illnesses most effectively.

Bipolar Disorder Medication

Not everyone responds to medications in the same way, and various medications are used to treat different bipolar disorder symptoms.

Individuals may need to try several different types of bipolar disorder medications before they find a solution that works best for them. The most commonly prescribed bipolar disorder medications are mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, and antidepressants.

Bipolar Disorder Medication: Mood Stabilizers

These are typically the first option in treating bipolar disorder. Prescriptions for mood stabilizers typically last for years. Lithium was the first FDA-approved mood stabilizer, and it remains the most popular and effective stabilizer. Side effects of Mood Stabilizers include:

  • Restlessness
  • Dry Mouth
  • Indigestion
  • Acne
  • Joint or muscle pain
  • Brittle nails or hair
  • Unusual discomfort with cold temperatures

Bipolar Disorder Medication: Atypical Antipsychotics

Atypical antipsychotics are typically prescribed along with antidepressants for individuals with bipolar I disorder. These are not as commonly prescribed as mood stabilizers and are only prescribed symptomatically. Side effects of atypical antipsychotics include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness upon standing
  • Blurred vision
  • Heart palpitations
  • Sun sensitivity
  • Skin rashes
  • Menstrual problems

Bipolar Disorder Medication: Antidepressants

Antidepressants are used to treat all types of bipolar disorder, but are rarely prescribed to exclusively treat the condition. Strictly taking antidepressants increases the likelihood of an individual switching to manic or hypomanic episodes, and/or developing rapid-cycling bipolar disorder. Consequently, antidepressants are usually used in conjunction with mood stabilizers.

Side effects of Antidepressants include:

  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Agitation
  • Diminished sex drive or difficulty enjoying sex

Bipolar Disorder Treatment: Psychotherapies

Psychotherapy is commonly prescribed along with medication. Therapy is particularly effective because it provides individuals with a condition and their families with support, education, and guidance. There is a myriad of psychotherapy methods used in treating bipolar disorder, but the most popular methods include:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): CBT is an evidence-based form of psychotherapy used to treat numerous behavioral and psychological conditions. CBT helps individuals with bipolar disorder identify and cope with their mood swings. If a person can recognize an impending mood swing, they will be able to effectively address it to mitigate the symptoms.
  • Interpersonal & Social Rhythm Therapy (IPSRT): IPSRT is empirically validated and designed to help individuals improve their moods by understanding and working with their biological and social rhythms. This helps bipolar people structure daily routines and improve their relationships with others. The structural approach of IPSRT is effective in protecting against manic episodes.
  • Psychoeducation: The goal of psychoeducation is to provide people with a deeper understanding and coping with mental health conditions. Psychoeducation is typically conducted in a group setting and is helpful for individuals with the condition and their family members.
  • Family-Focused Therapy: Family-focused therapy is a hybrid of psychoeducation and family therapy. The goal is to enhance family coping strategies, improve communication among family members, improve problem-solving skills, and be able to recognize incoming mood episodes to help their loved ones.

Leading Bipolar Disorder Treatment Center in Chicago

At our clinics, you can find the best psychiatrist for bipolar disorder near you! We conveniently have various clinics located throughout Chicago for greater accessibility no matter where you are.

Our team includes some of the top psychiatrists, psychologists, and therapists in the field, with extensive experience in diagnosing and treating bipolar disorder.

We’re committed to providing comprehensive and personalized care to help you manage and overcome bipolar disorder symptoms and other challenges such as depression in bipolar disorder.

Don’t let bipolar disorder control your life. Take the first step towards better mental health by contacting one of our Chicago mental health clinics near you. Book a consultation today to start receiving the best bipolar disorder treatment and support in your area.

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Bipolar Disorder Commonly Asked Questions

Bipolar Disorder Treatment & Support Providers

Camryn
Camryn McKee, MA
Therapy
Kortney
Kortney Genske, MA
Therapy
Serena
Serena Etcheson, MSW
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Hana
Hana Khan, LSW, MSW
Therapy
De'Ayne
De'Ayne Scaife, LSW, MSW
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Alia
Alia Radzik, MSW
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Lizbeth
Lizbeth Mancilla, MSW
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Amanda
Amanda Fox, LCPC
Therapy
Amanda
Amanda Stephans, LCSW, MSW
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Natalie
Natalie Eden, LCPC
Therapy
Jenny
Jenny Mantis, LCSW, MBA
Therapy
Bryanna
Bryanna Tartt, LCSW
Therapy
Alexandra
Alexandra Gremp, LPC, MEd, PEL
Therapy
Jade
Jade Austin, MA
Therapy
Elizabeth
Elizabeth Black, LCPC
Director of Clinical Therapy
Ross
Ross Pepper, MD
Psychiatrist
Jessica
Jessica Selk, LPC
Therapy
Anish
Anish Desai, MD
Psychiatrist
Sheena
Sheena Patel, PA-C
PA-C
Eldina
Eldina Okic, LCPC
Therapy
Ryan
Ryan Atkins, PA-C
Psychiatry
Kaitlyn
Kaitlyn Ehler, LSW
Therapy
Hannah
Hannah Wychocki, PA-C
PA-C
Maisha
Maisha Lowery, LCPC
Therapy
Lauren
Lauren Isdale, NP
Nurse Practitioner
Hope
Hope Hirsch, LPC
Therapist
Nathaniel
Nathaniel Epstein, MA
Therapist
Gabriella
Gabriella Lerner, PA-C
PA-C
Cyrus
Cyrus Ma, PA-C
PA-C
Maggie
Maggie Semprevivo, LSW
Therapy
Kamille
Kamille Haywood, LSW
Therapy
Zubair
Zubair Khan, PA-C
PA-C
Michelle
Michelle Augoustatos, LCSW
Therapy
Zachary
Zachary Delgado, LSW
Therapy
Nicholas
Nicholas Zaris, LPC
Therapy
Jordyn
Jordyn Pope, MA
Therapist
Laurel
Laurel Meiborg, LSW
Therapy
Haley
Haley Tarling, LPC
Therapist
Debby
Debby Fox, MA
Therapist
Raul
Raul Andrade, MA
Therapist
Sarah
Sarah Tarabey, LCPC
Therapist
Kumail
Kumail Hussain, MD
Young Adult and Child/Adolescent Psychiatrist
Kyla
Kyla Goggin, LCSW
Therapist
Michele
Michele Sitorus, PsyD
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Jaimee
Jaimee Jaucian, LCPC, BC-DMT
Therapy
Yenisis
Yenisis De Los Santos, LSW
Therapy
Sloan
Sloan Kodroff, LCPC
Therapist, Clinical Supervisor
Rahael
Rahael Mathew, LCPC
Therapist
Megan
Megan Becker, PA-C
PA-C
Emma
Emma Arsic, PA-C
PA-C
Paul
Paul Bamberger, PA-C
PA-C
Tonie
Tonie White, LCSW
Therapy
Jason
Jason Brescia, LCPC
Therapy
Sankrant
Sankrant Reddy, MD
Psychiatrist
Virginia
Virginia Harren, LCPC
Clinical Supervisor
Stephanie
Stephanie Osborne, PA-C
Psychiatry
Ashley
Ashley Seredynski, PA-C
PA-C
Christine
Christine Lantin, PA-C
PA-C
Brittney
Brittney Segoviano, LCPC
Therapist
Callie
Callie Perlman, LPC, NCC
Therapist
Maria
Maria Vasilopoulos, LPC, NCC
Therapy
Chad
Chad Gaynier, LCPC
Therapist
Bianca
Bianca Miller, LCPC
Therapist
Sean
Sean Saltzberg, LCSW
Therapist, Clinical Supervisor
Victoria
Victoria Nieman, LCPC
Therapist
Timothy
Timothy Kaatman, MD
Psychiatry
Sudhakar
Sudhakar Shenoy, MD
Adult and Child/Adolescent Psychiatrist
Sharon
Sharon Koys, PA-C
PA-C
Sara
Sara Fakhri, MA
Therapy
Veronika
Veronika Schroeder, MA
Therapy
Sean
Sean Saltzberg, LCSW
Therapist, Clinical Supervisor
Shanta
Shanta Gomez, LSW
Therapy
Reggie
Reggie Pacheco, PsyD
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Sarah
Sarah Beerman, LCSW, CADC
Therapist
Renie
Renie Stoller-Zak, LCPC
Therapy
Sahar
Sahar Eftekhar, DO
General & Addiction Psychiatrist
Rebecca
Rebecca Gilfillan, MD
Psychiatrist
Rebecca
Rebecca Kuhn, PA-C
PA-C
Rachael
Rachael Pettinicchi, MA
Therapy Clinical Intern
Shelby
Shelby Gordon, LCSW
Therapy
Sonnie
Sonnie Cousins, MA
Therapy
Nicole
Nicole Ortiz, PhD
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Elana
Elana Horowitz, PA-C
PA-C
Pavan
Pavan Prasad, MD
Psychiatrist
Mary
Mary Leighton, LPC
Therapy
Raymond
Raymond Myles, PsyD
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Michael
Michael Colombatto, PsyD
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Lovea
Lovea Smith, LCPC
Director of Therapy– Loop
Mariyah
Mariyah Hussain, MD
Adult and Child/Adolescent Psychiatrist
Leslie
Leslie Wolf, LCPC
Therapist
Maddie
Maddie Barnes, LCSW, PMH-C
Therapist, Clinical Supervisor
Lindsey
Lindsey Ashamalla, PsyD (PD)
Therapist
Khrystyna
Khrystyna Helner, LPC, MBA
Therapist
Laura
Laura Schroeder, LCPC
Therapist
Katerina
Katerina Fager, LCPC
Clinical Specialist
Kelli
Kelli Lo, LSW
Therapy
Kiran Binal
Kiran Binal Maharaja, MD
Psychiatrist
Karen
Karen Richardson, LCSW, ICDVP
Therapy
Keri
Keri Perillo, LCPC, CADC
Therapy
Lizzie
Lizzie Ausland, LCPC, CADC
Therapist
Kimberlie
Kimberlie Kuehne, LCPC
Therapy
Kalyan
Kalyan Rao, MD
Psychiatrist
Jonathan
Jonathan Kolakowski, MD
Psychiatrist
Judy
Judy Bitzer, LCPC
Therapist
Kaitlyn
Kaitlyn Delaney, MA, ATR-P
Therapy
James
James Histed, Clinical Intern
Therapy Clinical Intern
Julia
Julia Ray, Clinical Intern
Therapy
Jessica
Jessica Masbaum, LCSW
Therapist, Clinical Supervisor
Janel
Janel Wenger, AMFT
Therapist
Jeanette
Jeanette Marinier, PA-C
PA-C
Jamie
Jamie Schubert, PA-C
PA-C
Sherita
Sherita Hernton, PA-C
PA-C
Julie
Julie Daley, MSW
Therapist
Emily
Emily Maurer, LCPC
Therapist
Frank
Frank Sassetti, PsyD
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Emily
Emily Street, PA-C
PA-C
Emily
Emily Shelton, LCPC, LMHC, CADC, CAGCS, CRSS
Therapy
Eric
Eric Buchkoe, PsyD (PD)
Therapy
Tyler
Tyler Basham, Intern
Therapy Clinical Intern
Elizabeth
Elizabeth Russell, MA
Therapist
Thomas
Thomas Thurlow, NP
Psychiatry
Savannah
Savannah Sullivan, PA-C
PA-C
Summer
Summer Slininger, PA-C
PA-C
Ravali
Ravali Poreddy, MD
Psychiatrist
Ariella
Ariella Panos, PA-C
PA-C
James
James Ham, PA-C
Psychiatry
Rayna
Rayna Gorstein, PA-C
PA-C
Daniel
Daniel Shuter, LSW
Therapist
Victoria
Victoria Akhteebo, LPC
Therapy
Sierra
Sierra Purcell, PA-C
PA-C
Emily
Emily Hoag, MD
Psychiatrist
Grace
Grace Starrs, PA-C
Psychiatry
Cassie
Cassie Donahue, PA-C
Psychiatry
Gayathri
Gayathri Ganesh, PA-C
PA-C
Stella
Stella Tantillo, LSW
Therapy
Samuel
Samuel Budyszewick, LCSW
Director of Therapy- Evanston
Sydney
Sydney Means, LCSW
Therapist, Clinical Supervisor
Sara
Sara Pickens, LSW
Therapy
Ryan
Ryan Watters, LCSW, CADC
Therapy
Samuel
Samuel Eckert, PA-C
PA-C
Cindy
Cindy Meraz, LPC
Therapy
Chloe
Chloe Wesley, MA
Therapy
Nayeli
Nayeli Cruz-Castillo, LCPC
Therapy
Rafael
Rafael Lopez, MD
Psychiatrist
Samantha
Samantha Espinosa, MA
Therapy
Randi
Randi Schulman, LCSW
Therapist, Clinical Supervisor
Savanna
Savanna Murphy, LSW
Therapy
Kaitlin
Kaitlin Digrispino, LPC
Therapy
Scott
Scott Shadrick, PA-C
PA-C
Khadija
Khadija Manzoor, LPC, CRC
Therapy
Mira
Mira Ebalo, PA-C
PA-C
Lauren
Lauren Stanley, LCSW
Therapy
Meredith
Meredith Henry, LSW
Therapy
Mark
Mark Bey, LPC
Therapy
Samantha
Samantha Adjekum, LCPC
Therapy
Miriam
Miriam Mixon, LCSW
Therapist, Clinical Supervisor
Joel
Joel Muller, Ph.D.
Director of Clinical Therapy- River North
Mary
Mary Ivory, LCPC
Therapy
Cynthia
Cynthia Sodini, LCSW
Therapy
Jessica
Jessica Baran, LCPC
Therapy
Justin
Justin Lee, PA-C
PA-C
Jacqueline
Jacqueline Campagna, MA, EdS
Therapy
Jerri
Jerri Ganz, LCSW
Therapy
Katherine
Katherine Cunningham, LPC, CADC
Therapy
Elia
Elia Narvaez-Mushtaq, LPC
Therapy
Sam
Sam Donham, LCPC
Therapy
Carol
Carol Briggs, LPC, NCC
Therapy
Emily
Emily Filip, PA-C
PA-C
Gloria
Gloria Aguilar, LPC
Therapy
Emily
Emily Mathews, LPC, ATR-P
Therapy
Autumn
Autumn Holtschlag, ALMFT, LPC
Therapy
Jenna
Jenna Jacobson, PA-C
PA-C
Dane
Dane Davlantis, LCPC
Therapist, Clinical Supervisor
Carolyn
Carolyn Tatar, AMFT
Therapist