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Minority Mental Health Awareness Month–BIPOC Mental Health

July 17th, 2020

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The conversation surrounding mental health in the 21st century has shifted in ways people couldn’t have ever anticipated. Making mental health a priority has now made its way into many people’s daily routines. But this conversation is limited to those who have the access to these resources as well as the time in their day to dedicate to their mental health. Privilege isn’t limited to just work and social status, it goes much deeper than that.

Minority groups are not just limited to lacking resources and social injustices, but even the ability to have the conversation of the shifted generations. Many minority groups are left out of the conversation on how to better themselves.

These groups include but are not limited to, black, Hispanic, Asian, Native Americans, and those within the LGBTQ+ community. Many people are aware of the injustices and inequalities these groups face but don’t truly understand the impacts of issues surrounding these minority groups. There are a lot of ways to try and solve these issues, but in a community where these conversations are uncomfortable or unwelcome, the solutions must come from outside sources.

Row of students in a primary interracial classroom. Afro american girl paying attention to the teacher.

The reasons as to why minority groups suffer from mental health issues aren’t solely due to race, but more so the inequalities certain minority groups face from a young age. Many minority groups are impacted by displacement, lower income, and higher crime areas. Especially in schools that deal with lower funding, the resources for younger minority children may lack in comparison to schools with more funding.

Since a large factor as to why mental health is stigmatized at a larger rate than in white families, having mental health resources in these schools can make a larger shift than ever imagined. Having the resources in education is extremely important for any group or race, since, “Public schools have become the main provider of behavioral health services to children in the United States (US) and are responsible for approximately 70–80% of all behavioral health services delivered to children.”

Once education in lower socioeconomic areas was to include mental health resources for those that may not have the resources at home, or the conversation may not be welcome, school counselors could be one way to solve these disparities for younger minorities, ultimately creating a new generation where mental health is destigmatized.

Group of happy young children who are at school

In a society where minority groups are already lacking basic medical care as well as their voice in social movements, there is no confusion as to why these problems are reoccurring. Many people do not realize that according to the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2050, non-white racial and ethnic groups will represent more than 56 percent of the population. More than ever, it is important to educate these new generations to come, that their mental health is important and needs attention.

By making these younger generations more aware than ever as well as giving them the resources they need, these minorities, which ultimately will become the majority, will not suffer from silenced mental health issues.

More than ever, paying attention to the younger generations, especially those that come from ethnically diverse families, is vitally important for their mental health.

Clarity Clinic

At Clarity Clinic, we have highly trained staff who specialize in therapy and psychiatry services. To learn more about how we can support your mental health, call Clarity Clinic at (312) 815-9660 or schedule an appointment today.

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